Are we, like sheep, going astray: is costly signaling (or any other mechanism) necessary to explain the belief-as-benefit effect?

@article{SchuurmansStekhoven2017AreWL,
  title={Are we, like sheep, going astray: is costly signaling (or any other mechanism) necessary to explain the belief-as-benefit effect?},
  author={J. Schuurmans-Stekhoven},
  journal={Religion, Brain & Behavior},
  year={2017},
  volume={7},
  pages={258 - 262}
}
  • J. Schuurmans-Stekhoven
  • Published 2017
  • Biology
  • Religion, Brain & Behavior
  • 635–642. Sear, R., & Mace, R. (2008). Who keeps children alive? A review of the effects of kin on child survival. Evolution and Human Behavior, 29(1), 1–18. Shariff, A. F., & Norenzayan, A. (2007). God is watching you: Priming god concepts increases prosocial behavior in an anonymous economic game. Psychological Science, 18(9), 803–809. Sosis, R. (2003). Why aren’t we all Hutterites?: Costly signaling theory and religious behavior. Human Nature, 14(2), 91–127. Sosis, R., & Bressler, E. R. (2003… CONTINUE READING
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