Are the symptoms of cancer and cancer treatment due to a shared biologic mechanism?

@article{Cleeland2003AreTS,
  title={Are the symptoms of cancer and cancer treatment due to a shared biologic mechanism?},
  author={Charles S. Cleeland and Gary J. Bennett and Robert Dantzer and Patrick M. Dougherty and Adrian J. Dunn and Christina A. Meyers and Andrew H. Miller and Richard Payne and James M. Reuben and Xin Shelley Wang and Bang‐Ning Lee},
  journal={Cancer},
  year={2003},
  volume={97}
}
Cancers and cancer treatments produce multiple symptoms that collectively cause a symptom burden for patients. These symptoms include pain, wasting, fatigue, cognitive impairment, anxiety, and depression, many of which co‐occur. There is growing recognition that at least some of these symptoms may share common biologic mechanisms. 
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