Are extreme halophiles actually “bacteria”?

@article{Magrum2005AreEH,
  title={Are extreme halophiles actually “bacteria”?},
  author={L. Magrum and K. Luehrsen and C. Woese},
  journal={Journal of Molecular Evolution},
  year={2005},
  volume={11},
  pages={1-8}
}
  • L. Magrum, K. Luehrsen, C. Woese
  • Published 2005
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of Molecular Evolution
  • SummaryComparative cataloging of the 16S rRNA ofHalobacterium halobium indicates that the organism did not arise, as a halophilic adaptation, from some typical bacterium. Rather,H. halobium is a member of the Archaebacteria, an ancient group of organisms that are no more related to typical bacteria than they are to eucaryotes. 

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