Are dark cuckoo eggs cryptic in host nests?

@article{Langmore2009AreDC,
  title={Are dark cuckoo eggs cryptic in host nests?},
  author={Naomi E. Langmore and M. Stevens and Golo Maurer and Rebecca M. Kilner},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2009},
  volume={78},
  pages={461-468}
}
Cryptic cuckoo eggs hide from competing cuckoos
TLDR
The results suggest that competition between cuckoos has been the key selective agent for egg crypsis, which may be favoured over mimicry in intraspecific arms races because it can reduce the risk of egg removal to levels below chance.
Grey Gerygone hosts are not egg rejecters, but Shining Bronze-Cuckoos lay cryptic eggs
TLDR
Competition among cuckoos, rather than rejection by hosts, provides a stronger selection pressure for the evolution of cryptic eggs across the genus Chalcites.
Visual mimicry of host nestlings by cuckoos
TLDR
It is shown that, in the eyes of hosts, nestlings of three bronze-cuckoo species are striking visual mimics of the young of their morphologically diverse hosts, providing the first evidence that coevolution can select for visual mimicry of hosts in cuckoo chicks.
Egg shape mimicry in parasitic cuckoos
TLDR
First evidence of mimicry in egg shape in a cuckoo–host system is found, suggesting that mimicry at different levels (size, shape, colour pattern) is evolving in concert.
Brood parasites lay eggs matching the appearance of host clutches
TLDR
The results indicate that cuckoos select certain host nests to increase matching of their own eggs with host clutches, but only in chromatic characteristics, and suggest that the ability of cuckoo to actively choose host nests based on the eggshell appearance imposes a strong selection pressure on host egg recognition.
Thicker eggshells are not predicted by host egg ejection behaviour in four species of Australian cuckoo
TLDR
The hypothesis that thicker eggshells have evolved in response to host ejection behaviour in Australian cuckoos is not supported, but it is consistent with the hypothesis that thickness has evolved to reduce the risk of breakage when eggs are dropped into dome nests.
Egg discrimination by hosts and obligate brood parasites: a historical perspective and new synthesis
With the knowledge that cuckoos and cowbirds lay their eggs parasitically, and that some hosts eject parasitic eggs, ornithologists began to ponder the question of how host females discriminate
Common cuckoo females remove more conspicuous eggs during parasitism
TLDR
The results show that even in an open nest, eggs that are adequately hidden can also be protected from being picked up by cuckoo females during parasitism so as to increase the survival chance of their own parasitic eggs.
Multiple parasitism promotes facultative host acceptance of cuckoo eggs and rejection of cuckoo chicks
TLDR
A novel demonstration of adaptive clutch dilution suggests that multiple parasitism can favour a facultative response to brood parasite eggs, whereby hosts accept or reject parasite eggs depending on clutch composition.
Egg Discrimination in an Open Nesting Passerine Under Dim Light Conditions
TLDR
Study of egg rejection behaviour in nightingales, an open-nesting species that nests in deeply shadowed positions and lays very specific dark olive-green eggs, found blue and white eggs were rejected at a higher relative rate than the better achromatic matching black and green eggs.
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References

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The evolution of egg rejection by cuckoo hosts in Australia and Europe
TLDR
It is suggested that parasitism is always sufficiently costly to select for host defenses and that the evolution of defenses may be limited by proximate constraints such as visibility within the nest.
Escalation of a coevolutionary arms race through host rejection of brood parasitic young
TLDR
It is shown that the breach of host egg defences by cuckoos creates a new stage in the coevolutionary cycle and is suggested that it has selected for the evolution of nestling mimicry in bronze-cuckoos.
Cuckoos and cowbirds versus hosts: Co-evolutionary lag and equilibrium
TLDR
Experiments show co-evolution between the Common Cuckoo Cuculus canorus and its hosts and more acceptors among cowbird hosts in North and South America than among cuckoo hosts in Europe or southern Africa.
Cuckoos, Cowbirds and Other Cheats
TLDR
This book discusses the co-evolution of host defences and Common Cuckoo trickery, as well as one hundred species of brood parasitic birds and some puzzles.
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TLDR
Variation in egg puncturing is investigated to test the hypothesis that this behavior is adjusted adaptively and selects for host defenses in a coevolutionary manner and that honeyguides modify their puncturing behavior in an adaptive manner.
Brood-parasitism by the Shining Cuckoo Chrysococcyx lucidus at Kaikoura, New Zealand
TLDR
There is no evidence that the cuckoo parasitizes any host on mainland New Zealand other than the Grey Warbler Gerygone igata, but late laying by some Shining Cuckoos (relative to the host's incubational cycle), and late eviction, often led to brief inter-specific competition among nestlings for food.
Is greater eggshell density an alternative mechanism by which parasitic cuckoos increase the strength of their eggs?
TLDR
Comparisons to two control groups demonstrated that the parasitic cuckoos have eggshells of significantly higher density than would be expected for their size, supporting the hypothesis that the higher eggshell density is an alternative mechanism by which some cuckoo increase the strength of their eggs.
The comparative breeding behaviour of two sympatric cuckoos, Horsfield's Bronze-Cuckoo Chrysococcyx basalts and the Shining Bronze-Cuckoo C. lucidus, in Western Australia: a new model for the evolution of egg morphology and host specificity in avian brood
TLDR
Field observations and experiments with egg models indicated that neither of the major hosts, nor the secondary host in common, discriminate against foreign eggs, and the adaptive significance of competition between cuckoos as a selective agent for cuckoo egg morphology and host specificity is discussed.
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