Are blackcaps current winners in the evolutionary struggle against the common cuckoo?

@article{Honza2004AreBC,
  title={Are blackcaps current winners in the evolutionary struggle against the common cuckoo?},
  author={Marcel Honza and Petr Proch{\'a}zka and B{\aa}rd G Stokke and Arne Moksnes and Eivin R{\o}skaft and Miroslav {\vC}apek and Vojtěch Mrl{\'i}k},
  journal={Journal of Ethology},
  year={2004},
  volume={22},
  pages={175-180}
}
Blackcaps Sylvia atricapilla reject artificial cuckoo eggs, and their eggs vary little in appearance within clutches, whereas among clutches eggs vary considerably. Low variation within clutches facilitates discrimination of parasitic eggs, whereas high variation among clutches makes it harder for the cuckoo to mimic the eggs of a certain host species. These traits have most probably evolved as counteradaptations against brood parasitism by the common cuckoo Cuculus canorus, even though… Expand

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