Are big cities really bad places to live? improving quality-of-life estimates across cities

@inproceedings{Albouy2008AreBC,
  title={Are big cities really bad places to live? improving quality-of-life estimates across cities},
  author={David Y. Albouy},
  year={2008}
}
The standard revealed-preference hedonic estimate of a city's quality of life is proportional to that city's cost-of-living relative to its wage-level. Adjusting the standard hedonic model to account for federal taxes, non-housing costs, and non-labor income produces quality-of-life estimates different from the existing literature. The adjusted model produces city rankings positively correlated with those in the popular literature, and predicts how housing costs rise with wage levels… CONTINUE READING

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