Are antihistamines effective in children? A review of the evidence

@article{DeBruyne2016AreAE,
  title={Are antihistamines effective in children? A review of the evidence},
  author={Pauline De Bruyne and Thierry Christiaens and Koen Boussery and Els Mehuys and Myriam Van Winckel},
  journal={Archives of Disease in Childhood},
  year={2016},
  volume={102},
  pages={56 - 60}
}
Background and aims During the last decades, much attention has been paid to off-label and unlicensed prescriptions in paediatrics. However, on-label prescribing can also cause health issues. In this paper, the case of first-generation H1-antihistamines is investigated, notably the range of indications for which products are licensed in different European countries and the evidence base (or lack thereof) for each indication, as well as reported adverse drug reactions. Methods Review of the… 
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