Are all fishes ancient polyploids?

@article{vandePeer2004AreAF,
  title={Are all fishes ancient polyploids?},
  author={Yves van de Peer and John Stewart Taylor and Axel Meyer},
  journal={Journal of Structural and Functional Genomics},
  year={2004},
  volume={3},
  pages={65-73}
}
Euteleost fishes seem to have more copies of many genes than their tetrapod relatives. Three different mechanisms could explain the origin of these 'extra' fish genes. The duplicates may have been produced during a fish-specific genome duplication event. A second explanation is an increased rate of independent gene duplications in fish. A third possibility is that after gene or genome duplication events in the common ancestor of fish and tetrapods, the latter lost more genes. These three… 
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