Are Stress Eaters at Risk for the Metabolic Syndrome?

@article{Epel2004AreSE,
  title={Are Stress Eaters at Risk for the Metabolic Syndrome?},
  author={Elissa S. Epel and Sherlyn Jimenez and Kelly D. Brownell and Laura R Stroud and Catherine M. Stoney and Raymond S. Niaura},
  journal={Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
  year={2004},
  volume={1032}
}
Abstract: Stress eating is a health behavior that has been overlooked in much of health psychology research. It is largely unknown why some tend to eat during or after stressful periods, whereas others tend to lose their appetite and lose weight. Furthermore, it is unknown if such transient changes in food intake or macronutrient composition during stress have clinically significant consequences in terms of weight and metabolic health. The Brown University Medical Student Study examined… 
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Abstract The stress-eating relationship was examined in a prospective study of 158 subjects who completed daily records of stress and eating for 84 days, yielding 16.188 person days of observation.
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TLDR
It is proposed that people eat comfort food in an attempt to reduce the activity in the chronic stress-response network with its attendant anxiety, which may explain some of the epidemic of obesity occurring in the authors' society.