Are Stress Eaters at Risk for the Metabolic Syndrome?

@article{Epel2004AreSE,
  title={Are Stress Eaters at Risk for the Metabolic Syndrome?},
  author={E. Epel and S. Jimenez and K. Brownell and L. Stroud and C. Stoney and R. Niaura},
  journal={Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences},
  year={2004},
  volume={1032}
}
  • E. Epel, S. Jimenez, +3 authors R. Niaura
  • Published 2004
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
  • Abstract: Stress eating is a health behavior that has been overlooked in much of health psychology research. It is largely unknown why some tend to eat during or after stressful periods, whereas others tend to lose their appetite and lose weight. Furthermore, it is unknown if such transient changes in food intake or macronutrient composition during stress have clinically significant consequences in terms of weight and metabolic health. The Brown University Medical Student Study examined… CONTINUE READING
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