Are Pollination “Syndromes” Predictive? Asian Dalechampia Fit Neotropical Models

@article{Armbruster2011AreP,
  title={Are Pollination “Syndromes” Predictive? Asian Dalechampia Fit Neotropical Models},
  author={W. Armbruster and Yanbing Gong and Shuang-Quan Huang},
  journal={The American Naturalist},
  year={2011},
  volume={178},
  pages={135 - 143}
}
Using pollination syndrome parameters and pollinator correlations with floral phenotype from the Neotropics, we predicted that Dalechampia bidentata Blume (Euphorbiaceae) in southern China would be pollinated by female resin-collecting bees between 12 and 20 mm in length. Observations in southwestern Yunnan Province, China, revealed pollination primarily by resin-collecting female Megachile (Callomegachile) faceta Bingham (Hymenoptera: Megachilidae). These bees, at 14 mm in length, were in the… Expand
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