Are Megabats Big?

@article{Hutcheon2004AreMB,
  title={Are Megabats Big?},
  author={James M. Hutcheon and Theodore Garland},
  journal={Journal of Mammalian Evolution},
  year={2004},
  volume={11},
  pages={257-277}
}
Traditionally, bats (Order Chiroptera) are divided into two suborders, Megachiroptera (“megabats”) and Microchiroptera, and this nomenclature suggests a consistent difference in body size. To test whether megabats are, in fact, significantly larger than other bats, we compared them with respect to average body mass (log transformed), using both conventional and phylogenetic statistics. Because bat phylogeny is controversial, including the position of megabats, we employed several analyses… 
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