Are Bigger Brains Better?

@article{Chittka2009AreBB,
  title={Are Bigger Brains Better?},
  author={Lars Chittka and Jeremy E. Niven},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2009},
  volume={19},
  pages={R995-R1008}
}

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