Ardipithecus ramidus and the Paleobiology of Early Hominids

@article{White2009ArdipithecusRA,
  title={Ardipithecus ramidus and the Paleobiology of Early Hominids},
  author={Tim D. White and Berhane Abrha Asfaw and Yonas Beyene and Yohannes Haile-Selassie and C. Owen Lovejoy and Gen Suwa and Giday Woldegabriel},
  journal={Science},
  year={2009},
  volume={326},
  pages={64 - 86}
}
Hominid fossils predating the emergence of Australopithecus have been sparse and fragmentary. [] Key Result More than 110 specimens recovered from 4.4-million-year-old sediments include a partial skeleton with much of the skull, hands, feet, limbs, and pelvis. This hominid combined arboreal palmigrade clambering and careful climbing with a form of terrestrial bipedality more primitive than that of Australopithecus. Ar.

Palaeoenvironments and the origin of hominid bipedalism

Abstract It has long been accepted that hominids emerged during the Pliocene in a savannah environment in which a terrestrial quadruped gradually developed bipedal adaptations. However, data from the

Reexamining Human Origins in Light of Ardipithecus ramidus

A proposed adaptive suite for the emergence of Ardipithecus from the last common ancestor that the authors shared with chimpanzees accounts for these principal ape/human differences, as well as the marked demographic success and cognitive efflorescence of later Plio-Pleistocene hominids.

Fossil Hominins, the Bipedal Primates

Insights into the lower torso in late Miocene hominoid Oreopithecus bambolii

Investigation of features of the IGF 11778 pelvis and lumbar region based on torso preparations and supplemented by other O. bambolii material corrects several crucial interpretations and clarifies the phylogenetic and evolutionary scenarios for this peculiar hominoid.

The Great Divides: Ardipithecus ramidus Reveals the Postcrania of Our Last Common Ancestors with African Apes

Evidence from Ardipithecus ramidus now suggests that the last common ancestor lacked the hand, foot, pelvic, vertebral, and limb structures and proportions specialized for suspension, vertical climbing, and knuckle-walking among extant African apes.

New hominin fossils from Kanapoi, Kenya, and the mosaic evolution of canine teeth in early hominins

It is demonstrated that, although canine crown height did not differ between these species, A. anamensis had larger and more dimorphic roots, more like those of extant great apes and Ardipithecus ramidus , than those of A. afarensis .

Origins of Hominin Biocultural Diversity

A large body of evidence to date, including palaeontological, geological, environmental, archaeological, ecological and biogeographic data allow the reconstruction of the major phases of early hominin evolution, including the onset of biocultural evolution of humans in Africa.
...

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Reexamining Human Origins in Light of Ardipithecus ramidus

A proposed adaptive suite for the emergence of Ardipithecus from the last common ancestor that the authors shared with chimpanzees accounts for these principal ape/human differences, as well as the marked demographic success and cognitive efflorescence of later Plio-Pleistocene hominids.

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The Great Divides: Ardipithecus ramidus Reveals the Postcrania of Our Last Common Ancestors with African Apes

Evidence from Ardipithecus ramidus now suggests that the last common ancestor lacked the hand, foot, pelvic, vertebral, and limb structures and proportions specialized for suspension, vertical climbing, and knuckle-walking among extant African apes.

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The Ardipithecus ramidus Skull and Its Implications for Hominid Origins

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