Arctic reindeer extend their visual range into the ultraviolet

@article{Hogg2011ArcticRE,
  title={Arctic reindeer extend their visual range into the ultraviolet},
  author={Chris R. Hogg and Magella M. Neveu and K A Stokkan and Lars P. Folkow and Phillippa B. Cottrill and Ronald H. Douglas and David M Hunt and Glen Jeffery},
  journal={Journal of Experimental Biology},
  year={2011},
  volume={214},
  pages={2014 - 2019}
}
SUMMARY The Arctic has extreme seasonal changes in light levels and is proportionally UV-rich because of scattering of the shorter wavelengths and their reflection from snow and ice. Here we show that the cornea and lens in Arctic reindeer do not block all UV and that the retina responds electrophysiologically to these wavelengths. Both rod and cone photoreceptors respond to UV at low-intensity stimulation. Retinal RNA extraction and in vitro opsin expression show that the response to UV is not… Expand
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