Arctic-adapted dogs emerged at the Pleistocene–Holocene transition

@article{Sinding2020ArcticadaptedDE,
  title={Arctic-adapted dogs emerged at the Pleistocene–Holocene transition},
  author={Mikkel‐Holger S. Sinding and Shyam Gopalakrishnan and Jazm{\'i}n Ramos-Madrigal and Marc de Manuel and Vladimir V. Pitulko and Lukas F. K. Kuderna and Tatiana R. Feuerborn and Laurent Alain François Frantz and Filipe Garrett Vieira and Jonas Niemann and Jos{\'e} Alfredo Samaniego Castruita and Christian Car{\o}e and Emilie U. Andersen-Ranberg and Peter Jordan and Elena Yu Pavlova and Pavel A. Nikolskiy and Aleksei K. Kasparov and Varvara V. Ivanova and Eske Willerslev and Pontus Skoglund and Merete Fredholm and Sanne Eline Wennerberg and Mads Peter Heide-J{\o}rgensen and Rune Dietz and Christian Sonne and Morten Meldgaard and Love Dal{\'e}n and Greger Larson and Bent Petersen and Thomas Sicheritz-Pont{\'e}n and Lutz Bachmann and {\O}ystein Wiig and Tom{\'a}s Marqu{\`e}s-Bonet and Anders Johannes Hansen and M. Thomas P. Gilbert},
  journal={Science},
  year={2020},
  volume={368},
  pages={1495 - 1499}
}
Sled dog arctic adaptations go far back Dogs have been used for sledding in the Arctic as far back as ∼9500 years ago. However, the relationships among the earliest sled dogs, other dog populations, and wolves are unknown. Sinding et al. sequenced an ancient sled dog, 10 modern sled dogs, and an ancient wolf and analyzed their genetic relationships with other modern dogs. This analysis indicates that sled dogs represent an ancient lineage going back at least 9500 years and that wolves bred with… 
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