Archaeology and Native North American Oral Traditions

@article{Mason2000ArchaeologyAN,
  title={Archaeology and Native North American Oral Traditions},
  author={R. J. Mason},
  journal={American Antiquity},
  year={2000},
  volume={65},
  pages={239 - 266}
}
Abstract Archaeologists today are being urged from within and outside their profession to incorporate aboriginal oral traditions in reconstructing culture histories. Such challenges usually ignore or at least drastically underestimate the difficulties in doing so. Not least among those difficulties is that of attempting to reconcile inherently and profoundly different ways of conceptualizing the past without violating the integrity of one or the other or both. The pro and con arguments are… Expand
Archaeology and Oral Tradition: The Scientific Importance of Dialogue
Scientific archaeology and indigenous oral traditions have long been estranged. While there appears to be something of a thaw in recent years, the terms of epistemological engagement are unclear. AreExpand
Indigenous Oral History and Settlement Archaeology in Barkley Sound, Western Vancouver Island
In North America, Indigenous oral historical accounts of events in the distant past are regularly subject to the critique that such histories are contrived to suit practical political purposes and/orExpand
Inessential archaeologies: problems of exclusion in Americanist archaeological thought
This paper will present an intellectual history of Americanist historical archaeology as it developed from the 1960s onwards within the context of processual archaeology and the resultingExpand
“Poor White” Recollections and Artifact Reuse in Barbados: Considerations for Archaeologies of Poverty
Archaeologists regularly confront the material realities of economic inequality. This article contributes to a growing body of literature on the archaeology of poverty but challenges archaeologistsExpand
Stratigraphy and storytelling
Oral narratives and archaeological chronologies are diachronic systems of knowing the past. In this paper we explore how archaeologists working on the Northwest Coast of North America have imbricatedExpand
Conceptualizing the Everyday Life of Native Americans in the Distant Past
The daily lives of prehistoric Native Americans are often inappreciable to the contemporary researcher and sometimes overlooked by the professional archaeologist. The archaeological record is oneExpand
Archaeology, Memory and Oral Tradition: An Introduction
This paper serves as an introduction to this special edition of the International Journal of Historical Archaeology on the theme of archaeology, memory and oral history. Recent approaches to oralExpand
Intersecting magisteria
Stephen Jay Gould famously argued that science and religion are fundamentally ‘nonoverlapping magisteria’ — two spheres of understanding that should peacefully coexist without intersecting. However,Expand
Beyond the Margin: American Indians, First Nations, and Archaeology in North America
In North America, American Indians and First Nations have often been at odds with archaeologists over the status of their relationships, about who should have control over research designs andExpand
Re-Representing African Pasts through Historical Archaeology
Historical archaeology in Africa has long privileged issues framed in terms of European sources and the impact of imperialism and colonialism on African peoples. With its emphasis on modernity,Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 83 REFERENCES
Making Alternative Histories: The Practice of Archaeology and History in Non-Western Settings
After working in Third World contexts for more than a century, many archaeologists from the West have yet to hear and understand the voices of their colleagues in non-Western cultural settings. InExpand
ARCHAEOLOGICAL CULTURES AND CULTURAL AFFILIATION: HOPI AND ZUNI PERSPECTIVES IN THE AMERICAN SOUTHWEST
Archaeologists and Native Americans apply different concepts to classify ancient groups of people who lived in the past. This is a topic of current interest because many archaeologists in the UnitedExpand
An Archaeology of the Soul: NORTH AMERICAN INDIAN BELIEF AND RITUAL
My Personal Review: I find this book extremely pleasing and thought-provoking. Using a wealth of sources, Hall shows the persistence of Native American belief into modern times among a number ofExpand
Tsimshian ethno-ethnohistory : A real indigenous chronology
Tsimshian of the North Pacific Coast of Canada and Alaska insist that adawx, the term for one of their densely cultural epics, be translated as history. Each saga is firmly based in their matrilinealExpand
Great Lakes Archaeology
syntheses of various sub-areas, such as Michigan (Halsey 1999), Wisconsin (Birmingham et al. 1997), and southern Ontario (Ellis and Ferris 1990), this book remains the only synthesis focused on theExpand
PREHISTORY AND THE TRADITIONS OF THE O’ODHAM AND HOPI
Abstract The oral traditions and ceremonial practices of the O’Odham and Hopi people suggest the outlines of a reconstruction of events in the Southwest in late prehistory, and offer insight into theExpand
Archaeology of the Southwest
The long-awaited third edition of this well-known textbook continues to be the go-to text and reference for anyone interested in Southwest archaeology. It provides a comprehensive summary of theExpand
The American Indian and the problem of history
The problem of history for North American Indians is that historical consciousness has traditionally been irrelevent to them, perhaps even dangerous. Time, with its attendant experiences, realities,Expand
Oral tradition as history
Jan Vansina s 1961 book, "Oral Tradition," was hailed internationally as a pioneering work in the field of ethno-history. Originally published in French, it was translated into English, Spanish,Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...