Archaeological Evidence for the Emergence of Language, Symbolism, and Music–An Alternative Multidisciplinary Perspective

@article{dErrico2003ArchaeologicalEF,
  title={Archaeological Evidence for the Emergence of Language, Symbolism, and Music–An Alternative Multidisciplinary Perspective},
  author={Francesco d’Errico and Christopher S. Henshilwood and Graeme Lawson and Marian Vanhaeren and Annie Tillier and Marie Soressi and Fr{\'e}d{\'e}rique Bresson and Bruno Maureille and April Nowell and Joseba A. Lakarra and Lucinda Backwell and Mich{\`e}le Julien},
  journal={Journal of World Prehistory},
  year={2003},
  volume={17},
  pages={1-70}
}
In recent years, there has been a tendency to correlate the origin of modern culture and language with that of anatomically modern humans. Here we discuss this correlation in the light of results provided by our first hand analysis of ancient and recently discovered relevant archaeological and paleontological material from Africa and Europe. We focus in particular on the evolutionary significance of lithic and bone technology, the emergence of symbolism, Neandertal behavioral patterns, the… Expand
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