Archaea predominate among ammonia-oxidizing prokaryotes in soils

@article{Leininger2006ArchaeaPA,
  title={Archaea predominate among ammonia-oxidizing prokaryotes in soils},
  author={S. Leininger and T. Urich and M. Schloter and L. Schwark and J. Qi and G. Nicol and J. Prosser and S. Schuster and C. Schleper},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2006},
  volume={442},
  pages={806-809}
}
  • S. Leininger, T. Urich, +6 authors C. Schleper
  • Published 2006
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Nature
  • Ammonia oxidation is the first step in nitrification, a key process in the global nitrogen cycle that results in the formation of nitrate through microbial activity. The increase in nitrate availability in soils is important for plant nutrition, but it also has considerable impact on groundwater pollution owing to leaching. Here we show that archaeal ammonia oxidizers are more abundant in soils than their well-known bacterial counterparts. We investigated the abundance of the gene encoding a… CONTINUE READING
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