Archaea in protozoa and metazoa

@article{Lange2004ArchaeaIP,
  title={Archaea in protozoa and metazoa},
  author={M. Lange and P. Westermann and B. Ahring},
  journal={Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology},
  year={2004},
  volume={66},
  pages={465-474}
}
The presence of Archaea is currently being explored in various environments, including extreme geographic positions and eukaryotic habitats. Methanogens are the dominating archaeal organisms found in most animals, from unicellular protozoa to humans. Many methanogens can contribute to the removal of hydrogen, thereby improving the efficiency of fermentation or the reductive capacity of energy-yielding reactions. They may also be involved in tissue damage in periodontal patients. Recent… Expand
Archaeal symbionts and parasites.
TLDR
Several species of Archaea are involved in symbiotic or parasitic associations with representatives of Eukarya, Bacteria and other Archaea, and can often not be assigned to the 'classical' concepts of mutalism, commensialism or parasitism. Expand
Archaeal habitats--from the extreme to the ordinary.
TLDR
From the broad distribution, metabolic diversity, and sheer numbers of archaea in environments from the extreme to the ordinary, the roles that the Archaea play in the ecosystems have been grossly underestimated and are worthy of much greater scrutiny. Expand
Archaea as emerging organisms in complex human microbiomes.
TLDR
The state of knowledge of Archaea associated with the human microbiome is reviewed and DNA sequences indicative of the presence of additional methanogenic and non-methanogenic Archaea in the human intestinal tract are detected. Expand
Methanogens in the Gastrointestinal Tract of Animals
Nearly all vertebrates host methanogens in their gastrointestinal tracts. However, a great fraction of vertebrates emits only traces of methane from their faeces (approx. 1 nmol/g faeces/h) and hasExpand
Why Archaea Are Limited in Their Exploitation of Other, Living Organisms
TLDR
What might limit the potential for Archaea to serve as exploiters of other, living organisms is considered and it is suggested that a spectrum likely exists in which eukaryotes—among the three cellular domains—are most frequently exploitive of other species while Archaea are the least. Expand
Methanogens in the Gastro-Intestinal Tract of Animals
TLDR
The attribute “methane production” is evolutionarily stable, and the loss of this character obeys Dollo’s law: once lost in the course of evolution, this character cannot be acquired another time. Expand
The Discussion Goes on: What Is the Role of Euryarchaeota in Humans?
TLDR
The aim of this paper is to inspire the scientific community of “Archaea experts” for those unique archaeal organisms that have successfully participated in the human-microbe coevolution. Expand
Methanogens in the Digestive Tract of Termites
TLDR
The high methane emissions of termites, together with their enormous biomass in the tropics, make them a significant natural source of this important greenhouse gas. Expand
Methanogenic archaea in health and disease: a novel paradigm of microbial pathogenesis.
TLDR
It has become clear that a fundamental change of approach to the understanding and control of microbial diseases must be implemented and a comprehensive strategy is needed to elucidate the syntrophic associations that are essential for a healthy relation among microbes and between them and the host organism, and to unveil those associations that lead to disease. Expand
56 Methanogenesis in the Digestive Tracts of Insects
TLDR
The oxygen-reducing capacities of the few available isolates and their location in the microoxic gut periphery indicate that at least some species of this notoriously oxygen-sensitive group are well adapted to the continuous influx of oxygen into their habitat. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 106 REFERENCES
Endosymbiotic interactions in anaerobic protozoa
TLDR
Evidence is presented that hydrogenosomes evolved several times in the various protoctistan taxa, and molecular genetic data argue not only for different but even a chimeric origin of the hydrogenosome. Expand
Evolution of the Archaea.
TLDR
Recently, many new groups of Archaea that have not yet been cultured have been detected by PCR amplification of 16S ribosomal RNA from environmental samples, and the phenotypic and genotypic characterization of these new groups is now a top priority for further studies on archaeal evolution. Expand
Archaea and Their Potential Role in Human Disease
TLDR
It is puzzling that despite being one of the most numerous and ubiquitous life forms on earth, no member of the domain Archaea has been described as a human pathogen. Expand
A psychrophilic crenarchaeon inhabits a marine sponge: Cenarchaeum symbiosum gen. nov., sp. nov.
TLDR
The discovery and preliminary characterization of a marine archaeon that inhabits the tissues of a temperate water sponge and represents the first described symbiosis involving Crenarchaeota, and a symbiotic archaeon closely related to other nonthermophilic cren archaeotes that inhabit diverse marine and terrestrial environments is presented. Expand
Quantitative Determination of H2-Utilizing Acetogenic and Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria and Methanogenic Archaea from Digestive Tract of Different Mammals
TLDR
Archaea methanogens were the largest H2-utilizing populations in all animals, and a correlation was observed between the numbers of methanogen and those of cellulolytic microorganisms. Expand
Phylogeny of symbiotic methanogens in the gut of the termite Reticulitermes speratus.
TLDR
The phylogeny of a symbiotic methanogen inhabiting the gut of a lower termite, Reticulitermes speratus, was analysed without cultivation and indicated that the termite symbiotic meethanogen belonged to the order Methanobacteriales but was distinct from the known members of this order. Expand
ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF METHANOBACTERIUM RUMINANTIUM N. SP
Numerous investigators, starting with Reiset (1863), have demonstrated that much methane is formed in the rumen, suggesting that methanogenic bacteria are abundant in this environment. Information onExpand
Methanogens associated with rumen ciliates
TLDR
Methanogenesis per ciliate protozoan and most probable numbers (MPN) of methanogens per c affiliate were measured and observed to be affected by feeding and indicated that apparent methane production by ciliates depended primarily on the number of meethanogens associated with them. Expand
FECAL METHANOGENS AND VERTEBRATE EVOLUTION
TLDR
Competence for intestinal methanogenic bacteria is a plesiomorphic (primitive‐shared) character among reptiles, birds, and mammals, and this competence has been crucial for the evolution of the amniotes. Expand
Intestinal methanogenesis in primates--a genetic and evolutionary approach.
TLDR
The findings suggest a high specificity of the symbiosis between primates and methanogenic bacteria, and the persistence of significant numbers of methanogens in the hindgut might be facilitated by a specific receptor for methnogenic bacteria. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...