Archaea and the prokaryote-to-eukaryote transition.

@article{Brown1997ArchaeaAT,
  title={Archaea and the prokaryote-to-eukaryote transition.},
  author={J. R. Brown and W. Ford Doolittle},
  journal={Microbiology and molecular biology reviews : MMBR},
  year={1997},
  volume={61 4},
  pages={
          456-502
        }
}
Since the late 1970s, determining the phylogenetic relationships among the contemporary domains of life, the Archaea (archaebacteria), Bacteria (eubacteria), and Eucarya (eukaryotes), has been central to the study of early cellular evolution. The two salient issues surrounding the universal tree of life are whether all three domains are monophyletic (i.e., all equivalent in taxanomic rank) and where the root of the universal tree lies. Evaluation of the status of the Archaea has become key to… Expand
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The archaebacteria are the closest living prokaryote relatives of the eukaryotes and are given the formal name Archaea to discourage the common but seldom-voiced opinion that these organisms are really, all things considered, just funny bacteria growing in strange places. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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