Archaea and the cell cycle

@article{Bernander1998ArchaeaAT,
  title={Archaea and the cell cycle},
  author={R. Bernander},
  journal={Molecular Microbiology},
  year={1998},
  volume={29}
}
  • R. Bernander
  • Published 1998
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Molecular Microbiology
Sequence similarity data suggest that archaeal chromosome replication is eukaryotic in character. Putative nucleoid‐processing proteins display similarities to both eukaryotic and bacterial counterparts, whereas cell division may occur through a predominantly bacterial mechanism. Insights into the organization of the archaeal cell cycle are therefore of interest, not only for understanding archaeal biology, but also for investigating how components from the other two domains interact and work… Expand
Chromosome replication, nucleoid segregation and cell division in archaea.
TLDR
Genome sequence data indicate that in crenarchaea, the 'ubiquitous' FtsZ/MinD-based prokaryotic cell division apparatus is absent and division therefore must occur by unique, as-yet-unidentified mechanisms. Expand
The Structure, Function and Roles of the Archaeal ESCRT Apparatus.
Although morphologically resembling bacteria, archaea constitute a distinct domain of life with a closer affiliation to eukaryotes than to bacteria. This similarity is seen in the machineries for aExpand
Archaeal DNA replication: spotlight on a rapidly moving field
TLDR
This review is focused on recent progress on the structural and functional analysis of proteins and enzymes involved in the initiation and elongation steps of DNA replication in Archaea. Expand
The archaeal cell cycle: current issues
TLDR
Exciting areas for extended cell cycle investigations of archaea are identified, including termination of chromosome replication, application of in situ cytological techniques for localization of cell cycle proteins and the regulatory roles of GTP‐binding proteins and small RNAs. Expand
Archaeal cell cycle progress.
TLDR
Rapid progress of the archaeal cell cycle field is evident, and archaea, in particular Sulfolobus species, are emerging as simple and powerful models for the eukaryotic cell cycle. Expand
Comparative and functional analysis of the archaeal cell cycle
TLDR
Novel insights into the regulation and key components of the Sulfolobus acidocaldarius cell cycle have been obtained through genome-wide analysis of cell-cycle-specific gene expression, followed by cloning and characterization of gene products expressed at different cell cycle stages. Expand
The Viral Eukaryogenesis Hypothesis
  • P. Bell
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
  • 2009
TLDR
In the VE hypothesis, a cell wall‐less archaeon and an alpha‐proteobacterium established a syntrophic relationship, and then a complex DNA virus permanently lysogenized the archaeal syntroph to produce a consortium of three organisms that evolved into the eukaryotic cell. Expand
Archaeal DNA Replication Origins and Recruitment of the MCM Replicative Helicase.
TLDR
Recent advances in the understanding of the basis of archaeal origin definition are described and how the Archaeal initiator proteins recruit the replicative helicase to origins are described. Expand
Nucleoid structure and partition in Methanococcus jannaschii: an archaeon with multiple copies of the chromosome.
TLDR
During entry into stationary phase, chromosome replication continued to termination while no new rounds were initiated: the cells ended up with one to five chromosomes per cell with no apparent preference for any given DNA content. Expand
Cell Cycle Analysis of Archaea
TLDR
The studies showed that chromosome replication, nucleoid partition and cell division in Sulfolobus acidocaldarius, which are normally tightly coordinated during cellular growth, could be separately inhibited or uncoupled by mutation. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 43 REFERENCES
Archaea and the Origin(s) of DNA Replication Proteins
TLDR
Replication thus joins transcription and translation in compounding the central conundrum of cellular evolution, illustrated in Figure 1, with the uncoupling of molecular complexity in transcription, translation, and replication from complexity in cell structure is most peculiar. Expand
An archaebacterial homolog of pelota, a meiotic cell division protein in eukaryotes.
An open reading frame (pelA) specifying a homolog of pelota and DOM34, proteins required for meiotic cell division in Drosophila melanogaster and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, respectively, has beenExpand
Phylogenetic structure of the prokaryotic domain: The primary kingdoms
  • C. Woese, G. Fox
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 1977
TLDR
A phylogenetic analysis based upon ribosomal RNA sequence characterization reveals that living systems represent one of three aboriginal lines of descent: the eubacteria, comprising all typical bacteria, the archaebacteria, and the urkaryotes, now represented in the cytoplasmic component of eukaryotic cells. Expand
The hydrogen hypothesis for the first eukaryote
TLDR
A new hypothesis for the origin of eukaryotic cells is proposed, based on the comparative biochemistry of energy metabolism, to have arisen through symbiotic association of an anaerobic, strictly hydrogen-dependent, strictly autotrophic archaebacterium with a eubacterium. Expand
Cell cycle characteristics of thermophilic archaea
TLDR
The in vivo organization of the chromosome DNA appeared to be different from that of eubacteria, as revealed by variation in the relative binding efficiency of different DNA stains. Expand
FtsZ ring: the eubacterial division apparatus conserved in archaebacteria
  • Xunde Wang, J. Lutkenhaus
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Molecular microbiology
  • 1996
TLDR
Results indicate that the FtsZ ring was part of the division apparatus of a common prokaryotic ancestor that was retained by both eubacteria and archaebacteria. Expand
Complete Genome Sequence of the Methanogenic Archaeon, Methanococcus jannaschii
The complete 1.66-megabase pair genome sequence of an autotrophic archaeon, Methanococcus jannaschii, and its 58- and 16-kilobase pair extrachromosomal elements have been determined by whole-genomeExpand
Chromosome partition in Echerichia coli
TLDR
MukB, an alpha-helical coiled-coil protein, has been shown to be involved in chromosome partition, and this is the first candidate for a bacterial motor protein. Expand
Chromosome partition in Escherichia coli.
  • S. Hiraga
  • Medicine
  • Current opinion in genetics & development
  • 1993
TLDR
MukB, an alpha-helical coiled-coil protein, has been shown to be involved in chromosome partition, and this is the first candidate for a bacterial motor protein. Expand
The role of MCM proteins in the cell cycle control of genome duplication
TLDR
The role of proteins in the minichromosome maintenance (MCM) family is discussed, which may hold the key to understanding how DNA is replicated once, and only once, per cell cycle. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...