Arbuscular mycorrhizae in a long-term field trial comparing low-input (organic, biological) and high-input (conventional) farming systems in a crop rotation

@article{Mder2000ArbuscularMI,
  title={Arbuscular mycorrhizae in a long-term field trial comparing low-input (organic, biological) and high-input (conventional) farming systems in a crop rotation},
  author={Paul M{\"a}der and Stephan Edenhofer and Thomas Boller and Andres Wiemken and Urs A. Niggli},
  journal={Biology and Fertility of Soils},
  year={2000},
  volume={31},
  pages={150-156}
}
Abstract Arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) root colonization was studied in a long-term field trial in which four farming systems currently in use in Switzerland were continuously applied to a randomized set of plots at a single field site from 1978 till 1993. There were two low-input farming systems (organic and bio-dynamic) and two high-input (conventional) farming systems (according to Swiss guidelines of integrated plant production with and without farmyard manure). The systems had an identical 7… Expand

Figures and Tables from this paper

Contribution of arbuscular mycorrhiza to soil quality in contrasting cropping systems
TLDR
AM functioning made a higher contribution to soil quality in terms of crop performance and environmental benefits in the low-input cropping system than at either fertilisation rate in the conventional system. Expand
Mycorrhizal colonization of flax under long-term organic and conventional management
TLDR
There was a highly significant rotation × management system interaction, which may be explained by differences in the abundance of mycorrhizal and non-mycorrhIZal weed species between the two management systems. Expand
Tillage and farming system affect AM fungus populations, mycorrhizal formation, and nutrient uptake by winter wheat in a high-P soil
TLDR
Plants grown in chisel-disked plots had higher N and P utilization efficiencies than plants grown in no-tilled plots, and the nutrient-use efficiency of winter wheat depended on plant developmental stage, with a tendency for higher efficiency of the low-input plants at early growth stages, and of conventionally managed plants at more mature stages. Expand
Arbuscular mycorrhiza of winter wheat under different duration of organic farming.
The effect of continuous organic farming (OF) on the arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) of winter wheat (Triticum aestivum) was investigated in a greenhouse pot trial. Representative soil samplesExpand
Nutrient use efficiency and arbuscular mycorrhizal root colonisation of winter wheat cultivars in different farming systems of the DOK long-term trial.
TLDR
No clear evidence was found that AMF symbiosis contributed more to nutrient concentrations under low input than under high input conditions, and cultivars achieving high NUE in the organic systems were found among modern cultivars, irrespective of the breeding programme. Expand
Indigenous mycorrhizal seed-coating inoculation on plant growth and yield, and NP-uptake and availability on maize-sorghum cropping sequence in Lombok's drylands.
TLDR
AMF inoculation increases the plant yield and improves soil nutrient availability and is very advantageous for the growth of the maize-sorghum subsequent crop in Lombok’s drylands. Expand
Effect of agricultural management practices on arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal abundance in low-input cropping systems of southern Africa: a case study from Zimbabwe
TLDR
In smallholder farmers’ fields in the semi-arid tropics of sub-Saharan Africa, growing vigorous mycorrhizal plants prior to the dry season could be more important than minimizing P fertilizer applications, fallow periods, and tillage to maintain or increase AMF abundance. Expand
Impact of long-term conventional and organic farming on the diversity of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi
TLDR
The findings show that some AMF species present in natural ecosystems are maintained under organic farming but severely depressed under conventional Farming, indicating a potentially severe loss of ecosystem function under conventional farming. Expand
Mutualistic functioning of indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizae in spring barley and winter wheat after cessation of long-term phosphate fertilization
TLDR
After 10 and 11 years with- out fertilization, the total mycorrhizal and arbuscular colonization of the plots previously fertilized at this high rate were still significantly lower than in the plots subjected to the 0 and 17.5 kg ha -1 rates, although no decrease in total dry matter production was found. Expand
Mutualistic functioning of indigenous arbuscular mycorrhizae in spring barley and winter wheat after cessation of long-term phosphate fertilization
TLDR
After 10 and 11 years without fertilization, the total mycorrhizal and arbuscular colonization of the plots previously fertilized at this high rate were still significantly lower than in the plots subjected to the 0 and 17.5 kg ha–1 rates, and P-use efficiency was lower in these plots, although no decrease in total dry matter production was found. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 21 REFERENCES
VAM fungus spore populations and colonization of roots of maize and soybean under conventional and low-input sustainable agriculture
TLDR
The results indicate that conventional farming systems yield lower levels of VAM fungi whereas low-input sustainable agriculture, with cover crops planted between cash crops, has greater populations of Vam fungi and potential to utilize the benefits of VA mycorrhizae. Expand
Colonization of Strawberry Roots by VA Mycorrhizal Fungi in Agroecosystems under Conventional and Transitional Organic Management
ABSTRACT Mycorrhizal colonization of strawberry roots was studied for two agricultural management systems on the California central coast, one conventional and one in transition to organic. LowExpand
Differences in Mycorrhizal Colonization of Rye (Secale cereale L.) Grown in Conventional or Organic (Biological‐dynamic) Farming Systems
TLDR
The colonization of rye (Secale cereale L.) roots with vesicular-arbuscular (VA) mycorrhizal fungi was investigated at two sites, cultivated using conventional or biological-dynamic farming methods, with significant differences in VAM infection rate and infected root length. Expand
Does organic agriculture reduce soil erodibility? The results of a long-term field study on loess in Switzerland
In a long-term field trial in northwestern Switzerland, the effects of organic and conventional land-use management on earthworm populations and on soil erodibility were investigated. A silt loamExpand
Mycorrhizal Interactions in Sustainable Agriculture
TLDR
The impact of cultural practices and the particular role that VAM fungi play in improving soil structure are discussed in the context of sustainable farming. Expand
Improved procedures for clearing roots and staining parasitic and vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi for rapid assessment of infection.
TLDR
To improve stain penetration and clearing in whole mycorrhizal roots of onion and other host plants, and in roots infected by other fungi, the following two procedures are developed, which give deeply stained fungal structures which show distinctly against the outlines of the cells in the cortex of intact roots. Expand
REACTIONS OF MYCORRHIZAL FUNGI AND MYCORRHIZA FORMATION TO PESTICIDES
TLDR
It is now apparent that pesticides can have unforeseen effects on nontarget organisms and can thereby influence crop productivity as profoundly or even more so than do the pests they are intended to control. Expand
AN EVALUATION OF TECHNIQUES FOR MEASURING VESICULAR ARBUSCULAR MYCORRHIZAL INFECTION IN ROOTS
TLDR
The standard error of four methods of assessment based on observations of stained root samples either randomly arranged in a petri dish or mounted on microscope slides are calculated. Expand
Mycorrhizal Symbiosis 2nd ed
Vesicular-arbuscular mycorrhizae and cultural stress. In: Bethlenfalvay GJ, Linderman RG (eds) Mycorrhizae in sustainable agriculture
  • Proceedings of a Symposium, Denver,
  • 1992
...
1
2
3
...