• Corpus ID: 36729826

Arachnid envenomation.

@article{Saucier2004ArachnidE,
  title={Arachnid envenomation.},
  author={John R. Saucier},
  journal={Emergency medicine clinics of North America},
  year={2004},
  volume={22 2},
  pages={
          405-22, ix
        }
}
  • J. Saucier
  • Published 2004
  • Medicine
  • Emergency medicine clinics of North America
This article focuses on the medically relevant arachnid species found in North America and selected other arachnids from around the world. While it is largely still true that the geographic location of the envenomation assists in determining the species responsible, the booming trade in arachnids as exotic pets should prompt the clinician to inquire into this possibility. Expert advice should be sought in either case; species identification is critical in determining the need for and proper… 
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TLDR
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