Aquatic Therapy: Scientific Foundations and Clinical Rehabilitation Applications

@article{Becker2009AquaticTS,
  title={Aquatic Therapy: Scientific Foundations and Clinical Rehabilitation Applications},
  author={Bruce E. Becker},
  journal={PM\&R},
  year={2009},
  volume={1}
}
  • B. Becker
  • Published 1 September 2009
  • Medicine, Psychology
  • PM&R
Aquatic Therapy in Contemporary Neurorehabilitation: An Update
  • B. Becker
  • Medicine, Psychology
    PM & R : the journal of injury, function, and rehabilitation
  • 2020
TLDR
Aquatic therapy has been used extensively in a number of neurologic diseases and pathologies, and disease‐specific rehabilitative applications for this population are described.
Aquatic Therapy and Pain in the Rehabilitation Patient
TLDR
Buoyancy is a unique property of water that creates a beneficial physiologic response, which makes aquatic therapy a particularly helpful treatment option for patients suffering from chronic pain.
Aquatic-Based Therapy in Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation: Effective Yet Underutilized
TLDR
Although the use of aquatic therapy has been shown to improve function, more research is required to thoroughly investigate it and to develop protocols and safety measures that increase the variety of patients with access to this therapy.
Aquatic therapy in rehabilitation: A kinematic approach to understanding the efficacy of water-based exercise
TLDR
The primary aim of this thesis was to examine the kinematic effects of water-based squat variations on young, aged, and injured adults to further their application in rehabilitation.
Aquatic Physiotherapy: A Much Used and Little Studied Treatment Modality
TLDR
The aquatic physiotherapy, water exercise and hydrotherapy are deemed to be useful to the physiotherapist, however, hydrologist develops balneology.
AQUATIC THERAPY FOR A PATIENT POST-STROKE: A CASE REPORT
TLDR
It is suggested that aquatic therapy may be beneficial for patients with stroke who show minimal progress with land therapy or are unable to tolerate land activities.
Body Balance and Physiotherapy in the Aquatic Environment and at a Gym
TLDR
Physiotherapy in the aquatic environment makes a greater contribution to the improvement of body balance compared to physical exercises performed at a gym, and patients from both groups experienced a significant improvement in balance.
Benefits of aquatic exercise therapy on locomotion in low back pain subjects: a narrative literature review
TLDR
The aquatic therapy is a promising and interesting non-invasive intervention for the gait disorders of individuals with low back pain, but more consistent and controlled studies are necessary to judge the effectiveness of this treatment.
Aquatic Exercise for Treatment of Low-Back Pain
TLDR
The findings from this review suggest that aquatic therapy is superior to no treatment; however, it did not always prove more effective when compared with other forms of conservative treatment.
Aquatic exercise & balneotherapy in musculoskeletal conditions.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 214 REFERENCES
Aquatic-based rehabilitation and training for the elite athlete.
TLDR
Understanding the principles of movement in water will provide a foundation for creative use of water's unique properties and aid the physical therapist when designing a rehabilitation or training program for the athlete.
Biophysiologic Effects of Warm Water Immersion
TLDR
The aquatic environment is a research area just emerging as a focus of physiologic importance with many health benefits that apply across the age span and could be widely accessed by the American public if both research support and understanding by the health professionals were to increase.
Metabolic Responses and Mechanisms During Water Immersion Running and Exercise
TLDR
Current research into water immersion to the neck (WI) running, training specificity and comparative physiology is presented.
Therapeutic aquatic exercise in the treatment of low back pain: a systematic review
TLDR
Therapeutic aquatic exercise appeared to have a beneficial effect, however, no better than other interventions, and there is further need for high-quality trials to substantiate the use of therapeutic aquatic exercise in a clinical setting.
Effects of aquatic therapy on joint flexibility and functional ability in subjects with rheumatic disease.
TLDR
Findings support aquatic therapy as an effective means of increasing joint flexibility and functional ability while reducing pain and difficulty with daily tasks.
Aquatic Physical Therapy for Hip and Knee Osteoarthritis: Results of a Single-Blind Randomized Controlled Trial
TLDR
Compared with no intervention, a 6-week program of aquatic physical therapy resulted in significantly less pain and improved physical function, strength, and quality of life.
Efficacy of aquatic exercises for patients with low-back pain.
TLDR
Exercise in water may be one of the most useful modes of exercise for a patient with low-back pain and those patients who had performed exercises twice or more in a week showed a more significant improvement in the physical score than those who performed exercises only once a week.
Return to work following an aquafitness and muscle strengthening program for the low back injured.
PHYSIOLOGICAL ADAPTATIONS TO HEAD‐OUT AQUATIC EXERCISES WITH DIFFERENT LEVELS OF BODY IMMERSION
TLDR
The physiological responses when exercising on land are higher than when exercising with immersion to the hip and to the breast, and the energy expenditure was significantly higher when performing aquatic exercises on land.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...