Aquatic Microbiology for Ecosystem Scientists: New and Recycled Paradigms in Ecological Microbiology

@article{Cole1999AquaticMF,
  title={Aquatic Microbiology for Ecosystem Scientists: New and Recycled Paradigms in Ecological Microbiology},
  author={Jonathan J. Cole},
  journal={Ecosystems},
  year={1999},
  volume={2},
  pages={215-225}
}
  • J. Cole
  • Published 1 May 1999
  • Biology
  • Ecosystems
ABSTRACT In all ecosystems, bacteria are the most numerous organisms and through them flows a large fraction of annual primary production. In the past decade we have learned a great deal about some of the factors that regulate bacteria and their activities, and how these activities, in turn, alter ecosystem-level processes. Here I review three areas in which recent progress has been made with particular reference to pelagic ecosystems: the problem of bacterial cell dormancy; the effect of solar… Expand

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