Apraxia of speech and nonfluent aphasia: a new clinical marker for corticobasal degeneration and progressive supranuclear palsy

@article{Josephs2008ApraxiaOS,
  title={Apraxia of speech and nonfluent aphasia: a new clinical marker for corticobasal degeneration and progressive supranuclear palsy},
  author={Keith Anthony Josephs and Joseph R. Duffy},
  journal={Current Opinion in Neurology},
  year={2008},
  volume={21},
  pages={688–692}
}
Purpose of reviewTo highlight the fact that patients with corticobasal degeneration (CBD) and progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) can sometimes present with a progressive apraxia of speech, nonfluent aphasia, or a combination of the two disorders. Recent findingsCorticobasal degeneration and PSP are neurodegenerative diseases characterized by neuronal loss and gliosis in cardinal brain regions, as well as the abnormal deposition of the microtubule associated protein tau in cell bodies and cell… Expand
Progressive aphasia, apraxia of speech and agraphia in corticobasal degeneration: A 12-case series clinical and neuropsychological descriptive study.
TLDR
The findings suggest that aphasia in CBS might present as a 'mixed PPA', rather than an nfaPPA as previously stated, showing a combination of features of the nfa and logopenic variants of the PPA associated with AoS, stuttering and agraphia, which might be additional important cognitive markers for the clinical diagnosis of CBS and discriminating features of an nFAPPA presentation of a CBD. Expand
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
Understanding the relationship between AOS-dominant variants, including PPAOS and PPA, and their relationship to movement disorders including corticobasal degeneration and progressive supranuclear palsy, is important and will be the focus of this chapter. Expand
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Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) has been described as a clinical syndrome characterized by an impairment of voluntary control of gaze (supranuclear palsy), postural and gait instability, andExpand
A case of atypical progressive supranuclear palsy
TLDR
This case highlights the heterogeneity of the clinical features in this syndrome, demonstrating that atypical PSP can present as AOS and aphasia, without the classical features or involvement of the subcortical gray and brainstem region, commonly affected in typical PSP. Expand
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TLDR
A syndrome characterized by progressive pure apraxia of speech clearly exists, with a neuroanatomic correlate of superior lateral premotor and supplementary motor atrophy, making this syndrome distinct from primary progressive aphasia. Expand
Aphasia in Progressive Supranuclear Palsy: As Severe as Progressive Non-Fluent Aphasia.
TLDR
Tested formally, aphasia may be seen in progressive supranuclear palsy, with a severity similar to that seen in PNFA. Expand
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