Apraxia of Speech: An overview

@article{Ogar2005ApraxiaOS,
  title={Apraxia of Speech: An overview},
  author={Jennifer M. Ogar and Hilary Slama and Nina L Dronkers and Serena Amici and Maria Luisa Gorno-Tempini},
  journal={Neurocase},
  year={2005},
  volume={11},
  pages={427 - 432}
}
Apraxia of speech (AOS) is a motor speech disorder that can occur in the absence of aphasia or dysarthria. AOS has been the subject of some controversy since the disorder was first named and described by Darley and his Mayo Clinic colleagues in the 1960s. A recent revival of interest in AOS is due in part to the fact that it is often the first symptom of neurodegenerative diseases, such as primary progressive aphasia and corticobasal degeneration. This article will provide a brief review of… Expand
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  • Journal of speech, language, and hearing research : JSLHR
  • 2012
TLDR
PAOS is clinical disorder that should be distinguished from PPA and its recognition is important to clinical care provided by speech-language pathologists, but it also has implications for neurologic localization and diagnosis as well as prediction of underlying pathology and histochemistry. Expand
Primary progressive aphasia and apraxia of speech.
TLDR
The clinical, neuroimaging, and histopathological features of primary progressive aphasia and apraxia of speech are reviewed and the distinctions among these disorders for accurate diagnosis are increasingly important from a prognostic and therapeutic standpoint. Expand
Coming to Terms with a Conundrum: A Case of Primary Progressive Apraxia of Speech due to Corticobasal Degeneration?
TLDR
A single case of a patient with PPAOS and her clinical follow-up lasting 6 years, from the time she sought the authors' attention to her death which occurred 8 years into the disease, suggests the hypothetic need to discuss the broadening of the existing CBS criteria to encompass isolated P PAOS. Expand
Patterns of Poststroke Brain Damage That Predict Speech Production Errors in Apraxia of Speech and Aphasia Dissociate
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The pattern of brain damage associated with AOS was most strongly associated with damage to cortical motor regions, with additional involvement of somatosensory areas. Expand
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