Corpus ID: 24800973

Appropriate use of medical interpreters.

@article{Juckett2014AppropriateUO,
  title={Appropriate use of medical interpreters.},
  author={G. Juckett and Kendra Unger},
  journal={American family physician},
  year={2014},
  volume={90 7},
  pages={
          476-80
        }
}
More than 25 million Americans speak English "less than very well," according to the U.S. Census Bureau. This population is less able to access health care and is at higher risk of adverse outcomes such as drug complications and decreased patient satisfaction. Title VI of the Civil Rights Act mandates that interpreter services be provided for patients with limited English proficiency who need this service, despite the lack of reimbursement in most states. Professional interpreters are superior… Expand

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