Appropriate Models for the Management of Infectious Diseases

@article{Wearing2005AppropriateMF,
  title={Appropriate Models for the Management of Infectious Diseases},
  author={Helen J. Wearing and Pejman Rohani and Matt J. Keeling},
  journal={PLoS Medicine},
  year={2005},
  volume={2}
}
Background Mathematical models have become invaluable management tools for epidemiologists, both shedding light on the mechanisms underlying observed dynamics as well as making quantitative predictions on the effectiveness of different control measures. Here, we explain how substantial biases are introduced by two important, yet largely ignored, assumptions at the core of the vast majority of such models. Methods and Findings First, we use analytical methods to show that (i) ignoring the latent… Expand

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