Apportionment of nuptial alkaloidal gifts by a multiply-mated female moth (Utetheisa ornatrix): eggs individually receive alkaloid from more than one male source

@article{Bezzerides2002ApportionmentON,
  title={Apportionment of nuptial alkaloidal gifts by a multiply-mated female moth (Utetheisa ornatrix): eggs individually receive alkaloid from more than one male source},
  author={Alexander L. Bezzerides and Thomas Eisener},
  journal={CHEMOECOLOGY},
  year={2002},
  volume={12},
  pages={213-218}
}
Summary. In the moth Utetheisa ornatrix the female is promiscuous and receives a nuptial gift of pyrrolizidine alkaloid (PA) by seminal infusion from each mate. The alkaloidal gifts are transmitted by the female to the eggs, which are protected as a result. We here show that individual eggs may receive PAs from more than one male source and that individual males have no assurance that the PA they themselves contribute to the female will find its way exclusively to eggs of their siring.  

Corematal function in Utetheisa ornatrix (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae): Hydroxydanaidal is devoid of intrinsic defensive potency

Summary.Hydroxydanaidal, the pyrrolizidine alkaloid-derived male corematal pheromone active in the close-range precopulatory interactions of the moth Utetheisa ornatrix, appears not to contribute to

Sperm storage and arrangement within females of the arctiid moth Utetheisa ornatrix.

Female Promiscuity Does Not Lead to Increased Fertility or Fecundity in an Arctiid Moth (Utetheisa ornatrix)

Evidence is shown that U. ornatrix females are not taking multiple mates as fertilization insurance because females that mate once are as fertile as those that mate three times; and females that take three different mates are no more fertile than those that mates three times with the same male.

Female pheromonal chorusing in an arctiid moth, Utetheisa ornatrix

An unusual case of communal sexual display in the arctiid moth Utetheisa ornatrix is reported that is designated "female pheromonal chorusing", and it is argued that this biased sex ratio generates intrasexual competition among females, to which they respond by elevating signaling effort such that the likelihood of at least matching their neighbors' signals is increased.

Corematal function in Utetheisa ornatrix: interpretation in the light of data from field-collected males

Evidence presented here shows that field-collected males, which could be expected to be mostly non-virginal, are of reduced acceptability to females, explaining possibly why they should be held in lesser regard.

Quinolizidine and Pyrrolizidine Alkaloid Chemical Ecology – a Mini-Review on Their Similarities and Differences

  • M. Wink
  • Biology, Chemistry
    Journal of chemical ecology
  • 2019
This mini-review summarizes over 40 years of research on quinolizidine (QAs) and pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs) to allow deeper insights in the molecular evolution of these two classes of alkaloid in plant-insect interactions.

Quinolizidine and Pyrrolizidine Alkaloid Chemical Ecology – a Mini-Review on Their Similarities and Differences

  • M. Wink
  • Biology, Chemistry
    Journal of Chemical Ecology
  • 2018
This mini-review summarizes over 40 years of research on quinolizidine (QAs) and pyrrolizidine alkaloids (PAs), which serve as general defense compounds against herbivores for the plants producing them.

Experience counts: females favor multiply mated males over chemically endowed virgins in a moth (Utetheisa ornatrix)

  • V. Iyengar
  • Biology
    Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
  • 2009
It is demonstrated that males with mating experience can secure copulations despite deficiencies in the pheromone, and possible mechanisms are provided and discussed to discuss their implications regarding sexual selection.

Effectiveness of tiger moth (Lepidoptera, Arctiidae) chemical defenses against an insectivorous bat (Eptesicus fuscus)

It is argued that intense selective pressure provided by vertebrate predators including bats has driven the tiger moths to sequester more and more potent deterrents against them and to acquire a suite of morphology characteristics and behaviors that advertise their noxious taste.

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Field and laboratory tests showed that the alkaloids of Utetheisa ornatrix protect eggs from predators, and a previously identified pheromone, derived by the male from the alkAloid and emitted during precopulatory behavior, may announce the male alkaloidal worth to the female.

Pheromonal advertisement of a nuptial gift by a male moth (Utetheisa ornatrix).

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The moth Utetheisa ornatrix (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae) is protected against predation by pyrrolizidine alkaloids that it sequesters as a larva from its foodplants, and females reinforce after copulation the choice mechanism they already exercise during courtship.

Precopulatory sexual interaction in an arctiid moth (Utetheisa ornatrix): Role of a pheromone derived from dietary alkaloids

It is proposed that in addition to signalling male presence to the female, hydroxydanaidal may provide the means whereby the female assesses the alkaloid content of the male and therefore his degree of chemical protectedness.

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Evidence is presented, based on matings in which males were induced to deliver spermatophores disproportionate in size to body mass, that the determinant is sperMatophore mass.

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