Apportionment of global human genetic diversity based on craniometrics and skin color.

@article{Relethford2002ApportionmentOG,
  title={Apportionment of global human genetic diversity based on craniometrics and skin color.},
  author={John H Relethford},
  journal={American journal of physical anthropology},
  year={2002},
  volume={118 4},
  pages={
          393-8
        }
}
  • J. Relethford
  • Published 1 August 2002
  • Biology
  • American journal of physical anthropology
A number of analyses of classical genetic markers and DNA polymorphisms have shown that the majority of human genetic diversity exists within local populations (approximately 85%), with much less among local populations (approximately 5%) or between major geographic regions or "races" (approximately 10%). Previous analysis of craniometric variation (Relethford [1994] Am J Phys Anthropol 95:53-62) found that between 11-14% of global diversity exists among geographic regions, with the remaining… 

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