Application of the ecosystem mimic concept to the species-rich Banksia woodlands of Western Australia

@article{Pate2004ApplicationOT,
  title={Application of the ecosystem mimic concept to the species-rich Banksia woodlands of Western Australia},
  author={John S. Pate and Tina L. Bell},
  journal={Agroforestry Systems},
  year={2004},
  volume={45},
  pages={303-341}
}
This article describes the structure and functioning of a natural Banksia woodland at Moora, Western Australia. Species are first grouped in terms of growth form, root morphology, phenology and nutrient acquisition strategy. Above- and belowground standing biomass of a woodland is measured and its net annual primary production per unit rainfall compared with that of adjacent crops and plantings of the tree tagasaste. Information on seasonal water use and nutrient cycling in the dominant tree… Expand

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