Application of an in vitro model to evaluate bioadhesion of fibroblasts and epithelial cells to two different dressings.

Abstract

The cellular component of a healing wound consists of many cell types and the environment in which these cells grow is important to the rate and quality of healing which can be influenced by the type of dressing used. The most commonly used dressings are traditional gauze-type dressings. In many cases these dressings may adhere to the wound surface, and subsequent removal is often traumatic, causing pain and tissue reinjury. Some modern gelling dressings have been developed to overcome this adherence problem. In order to evaluate in more detail cell-dressing interactions, an in vitro model has been developed utilising wound fibroblasts and epithelial cells. Quantitative evaluation of adherence of cells cultured with a traditional gauze or a new gelling dressing has been undertaken using radiolabel and manual counting techniques. Scanning electron microscopy has been used to visualise the cells adherent to dressings allowing evaluation of their adhesion-morphology. The results show differential attachment of cells to viscose and gelling fibres of the dressings; considerably reduced cell adhesion to the gelling fibre was evident, and it was apparent that cells adhered predominantly to the viscose component of the dressing. This model can be used to investigate and compare the adhesion of cells to different dressings and their components.

Cite this paper

@article{Cochrane1999ApplicationOA, title={Application of an in vitro model to evaluate bioadhesion of fibroblasts and epithelial cells to two different dressings.}, author={Christine A Cochrane and Mark G . Rippon and Alan A Rogers and Russel Walmsley and Derek C. Knottenbelt and Philip G Bowler}, journal={Biomaterials}, year={1999}, volume={20 13}, pages={1237-44} }