• Corpus ID: 221341296

Application of Botulinum Toxin Type A in the Management of Ranula

@inproceedings{ShaaneKareemi2019ApplicationOB,
  title={Application of Botulinum Toxin Type A in the Management of Ranula},
  author={Dr. Shaan-e-Kareemi and Dr. Neelkanth M. Warad and Dr. Tousif Mullah and Dr. Muhammed Yaseen and Dr. Ashwin Hiremath and Dr. Tahura Killedar},
  year={2019}
}
Ranula presents clinically as a painless mucus pseudocyst in the floor of the mouth. They typically grow slowly and may be reported as a cycle of rupture and recurrence. Simple ranulas are mucus walled off above the mylohyoid muscle. Complex or plunging ranulas develop when the mucus extravasation extends through or around the mylohyoid muscle and deeper into the neck. Various treatment modalities have been advocated based on the size and location of the ranula. Deep plunging ranulas can be… 

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