Apparent molar heat capacities and volumes of electrolytes and ions int-butanol-water mixtures

@article{Hefter1989ApparentMH,
  title={Apparent molar heat capacities and volumes of electrolytes and ions int-butanol-water mixtures},
  author={Glenn T. Hefter and Jean-Pierre E Grolier and Alain H. Roux},
  journal={Journal of Solution Chemistry},
  year={1989},
  volume={18},
  pages={229-248}
}
The apparent molar volumes Vϕ and heat capacities Cp,ϕ of NaCl, LiCl, NaF, KI, NaBPh4 and Ph4PCl have been determined in solutions of H2O containing up to 40 mass% t-butyl alcohol (TBA) by flow densitometry and flow microcalorimetry. Combination of these results with literature data allows calculation of Vϕ and Cp,ϕ for 16 ions in these mixtures using the assumption that ΔtXφ(Ph4P+) = ΔtXφ(BPh4−) where X=V or Cp and ΔtXφ is the change in Xϕ for a species on transfer from H2O to TBA-H2O mixtures… 
Apparent molar heat capacities and volumes of electrolytes and ions in acetonitrile-water mixtures
Apparent molar volumes Vφ and heat capacities Cp,φ of NaCl, KCl, KNO3, AgNO3, KI, NaBPh4 and Ph4PCl have been measured in acetonitrile (AN)-water mixtures up to xAN=0.25 by flow densitometry and flow
Limiting Partial Molar Volumes of Electrolytes in 2-Methyl-2-Butanol + Water Mixtures at 298.15 K
Partial molar volumes at infinite dilution, V02, of alkali–metal halides (LiCl, NaCl KCl RbCl CsCl, NaBr, KBr, KI), tetra-n-alkylammonium bromides, R4NBr (R=Me, Et, n-Pr, n-Bu, n-Pen), NaBPh4, and
Molar Volumes and Heat Capacities of Electrolytes and Ions in Nonaqueous Solvents: 1. Formamide
Apparent molar volumes and heat capacities of 27 electrolytes have been measured as a function of concentration in formamide at 25°C using a series-connected flow densimeter and Picker calorimeter
Ion solvation in lithium battery electrolyte solutions. 1. Apparent molar volumes
Apparent molar volumes, Vϕ(MX), of seven electrolytes (NaClO4, NaCF3SO3, NaBPh4, LiClO4, LiAsF6, Ph4AsCF3SO3 and KCF3SO3) have been determined by vibrating-tube densimetry in nonaqueous solvent
Partial molar volumes of monovalent ions in ethanolamine and water + ethanolamine mixtures at 25°C
Precise densities for sodium of chloride, bromide and iodide and potassium iodide in ethanolamine and water+ethanolamine mixtures (15, 30, 50, 60, 70, 80 and 90 mass% ethanolamine) up to a maximum
Limiting partial molar volumes of electrolytes in dimethylformamide–water mixtures at 298.15 K
Limiting partial molar volumes of electrolytes in several water-dimethyl sulfoxide mixtures, up to xDMSO= 0.1587, have been determined from density measurements at 298.15 K. A reference electrolyte
Apparent Molar Heat Capacities of n-Alcohols (C2 to C4) and Symmetric Tetraalkylammonium Bromides (C2 to C5) in Water–N,N-Dimethylformamide Mixtures: Methylene Group Contribution and Hydrophobic Hydration
The apparent molar heat capacities, ϕCp, of ethanol, n-propanol, n-butanol, and tetraethylammonium, tetra-n-propylammonium, tetra-n-butylammonium and tetra-n-pentylammonium bromides have been
Volumes of mixtures of alcohols in water at 25°C
Many studies support the idea that alcohols in water undergo microphase transitions which are, in many respects, similar to micellization. To investigate the interactions in these systems even
...
1
2
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 24 REFERENCES
Apparent molal volumes and heat capacities of some alkali halides and tetraalkylammonium bromides in aqueoustert-butanol solutions
The densities and volumetric specific heats of hydrochloric acid, alkali chlorides and bromides, and tetraalkylammonium bromides were measured in 0 to 40% by weighttert-butanol (t-BuOH) in water with
Apparent molal volumes and heat capacities of some 1:1 electrolytes in anhydrous methanol at 25°C
A flow calorimeter and flow densimeter have been used to measure volume specific heats and densities of solutions of LiCl, LiBr, NaCl, NaBr, KF, KBr, Kl, CsF, and Bu4NBr in anhydrous methanol at
Heat capacities of tetra-alkylammonium bromides in water and in anhydrous methanol at various temperatures
Abstract Heat capacities of solution ΔC p o of tetramethylammonium bromide and tetra- n -butylammonium bromide have been determined, by the integral enthalpy of solution method, in water over the
Molar Heat Capacities of Binary Liquid Mixtures: 1,2‐Dichlorethane + Benzene, + Toluene, and + p‐Xylene
The molar heat capacity at constant pressure CP for the binary mixtures 1,2-dichloroethane(x1) + benzene, + toluene, and + p-xylene, were determined at 298.15 K from measurements of volumetric heat
The thermodynamics of solvation of ions. Part 1.—The heat capacity of hydration at 298.15 K
Values of the standard partial molar heat capacities of aqueous electrolytes have been critically selected from the literature and have been divided into ionic contributions using the assumption that
The thermodynamics of solvation of ions. Part 3.—The heat capacity for solvation of gaseous ions in methanol at 298.15 K
Literature values of the standard partial molar heat capacities of 1:1 electrolytes in methanol have been divided into ionic contributions using the assumption that [graphic omitted]. Combination
Ultrasonic vibration potentials, apparent molal volumes, and apparent molal heat capacities of 1:1 electrolytes in acetonitrile
The ultrasonic vibration potentials and apparent molal volumes for many inorganic and organic electrolytes were measured in acetonitrile at 25°C and combined to obtain ionic contributions to the
Molar Heat Capacity and Isothermal Compressibility of Binary Liquid Mixtures: Carbon Tetrachloride + Benzene, Carbon Tetrachloride + Cylohexane and Benzene + Cylohexane
The molar heat capacity at constant pressure Cp, for the three binary liquid mixtures carbon tetrachloride + benzene, carbon tetrachloride + cyclohexane, and benzene + cyclohexane was determined at
Free energies and entropies of transfer of hydrobromic and hydroiodic acids from water to t-butyl alcohol + water mixtures from electromotive force measurements at different temperatures (5—35°C)
Free energies, ΔG0t and entropies, ΔS0t of transfer of hydrobromic and hydroiodic acids from water to t-butyl alcohol + water mixtures containing 10, 20, 30 and 50 % t-butyl alchol by weight have
Ionic solvation in water + co-solvent mixtures. Part 4.—Free energies of transfer of single ions from water into water + t-butyl alcohol mixtures
The method used to calculate the free energy of transfer of the proton, ΔG°t(H+), from water into mixtures of water with various co-solvents has now been applied to water + t-butyl alcohol mixtures:
...
1
2
3
...