Apparent Survival of Adult Magnificent Frigatebirds in the Breeding Colony of Isla Isabel, Mexico

@inproceedings{Gonzlez2007ApparentSO,
  title={Apparent Survival of Adult Magnificent Frigatebirds in the Breeding Colony of Isla Isabel, Mexico},
  author={M{\'o}nica Gonz{\'a}lez and Horacio De la Cueva},
  year={2007}
}
Abstract Annual apparent survival rates of the Magnificent Frigatebird (Fregata magnificens) were estimated from 1998 to 2003 using a capture-resight model with 870 marked adult birds on Isla Isabel, México (21°51’N, 105°54’W). [] Key Result The most parsimonious model was a time since marking model (or two age class model) with constant resighting rate for males and females (pm and pf), constant apparent survival rate for males in both age classes (ϕ1m and ϕ2+m), and time-dependent apparent survival rate…

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