Aposematic (warning) coloration associated with thorns in higher plants.

@article{LevYadun2001AposematicC,
  title={Aposematic (warning) coloration associated with thorns in higher plants.},
  author={Simcha Lev-Yadun},
  journal={Journal of theoretical biology},
  year={2001},
  volume={210 3},
  pages={
          385-8
        }
}
  • S. Lev-Yadun
  • Published 2001
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Journal of theoretical biology
Aposematic coloration, a well-known phenomenon in animals, has been given little attention in plants. Here I discuss two types of conspicuousness of thorns which are typical of many plant species: (1) colorful thorns, and (2) white spots, or white and colorful stripes, associated with thorns in leaves and stems. Both types of aposematic coloration predominate the spine system of taxa rich with spiny species-Cacti, the genera Agave, Aloe and Euphorbia. The phenomena have been recorded here in… Expand
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