Apidima Cave fossils provide earliest evidence of Homo sapiens in Eurasia

@article{Harvati2019ApidimaCF,
  title={Apidima Cave fossils provide earliest evidence of Homo sapiens in Eurasia},
  author={Katerina Harvati and Carolin R{\"o}ding and Abel Marinus Bosman and Fotios Alexandros Karakostis and Rainer Gr{\"u}n and Chris B Stringer and Panagiotis Karkanas and Nicholas Thompson and Vassilis Koutoulidis and Lia Angela Moulopoulos and Vassilis G. Gorgoulis and Mirsini Kouloukoussa},
  journal={Nature},
  year={2019},
  pages={1-5}
}
Two fossilized human crania (Apidima 1 and Apidima 2) from Apidima Cave, southern Greece, were discovered in the late 1970s but have remained enigmatic owing to their incomplete nature, taphonomic distortion and lack of archaeological context and chronology. Here we virtually reconstruct both crania, provide detailed comparative descriptions and analyses, and date them using U-series radiometric methods. Apidima 2 dates to more than 170 thousand years ago and has a Neanderthal-like… Expand
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