Aphasia in a user of British Sign Language: Dissociation between sign and gesture

@article{Marshall2004AphasiaIA,
  title={Aphasia in a user of British Sign Language: Dissociation between sign and gesture},
  author={Jane Marshall and Joanna R Atkinson and Elaine Smulovitch and Alice Thacker and Bencie Woll},
  journal={Cognitive Neuropsychology},
  year={2004},
  volume={21},
  pages={537 - 554}
}
This paper reports a single case investigation of “Charles”, a Deaf man with sign language aphasia following a left CVA. Anomia, or a deficit in sign retrieval, was a prominent feature of his aphasia, and this showed many of the well‐documented characteristics of speech anomia. For example, sign retrieval was sensitive to familiarity, it could be cued, and there were both semantic and phonological errors. Like a previous case in the literature (Corina, Poizner, Bellugi, Feinberg, Dowd, & O… Expand
Aphasia in a bilingual user of British signlanguage and english: Effects of cross-linguistic cues
TLDR
Maureen, a Deaf woman who was bilingual in British Sign Language and English, and who had aphasia following a left-hemisphere CVA, could be cued to produce English spoken nouns by the provision of the corresponding BSL sign, and may be able to exploit direct (nonsemantic) links between her BSL and English lexicons. Expand
The link between form and meaning in British sign language: effects of iconicity for phonological decisions.
TLDR
It is demonstrated that iconicity effects permeate the entire language system, arising automatically even when access to meaning is not needed, and this leads to interference in making form-based decisions. Expand
A case of impaired verbalization but preserved gesticulation of motion events
TLDR
Study of Marcel, an English speaker with a unilateral left-hemisphere lesion affecting frontal, parietal, and temporal sectors of the perisylvian cortex, improves understanding of how some brain-damaged individuals with severe aphasia but without manual apraxia can successfully employ gesture to augment the semantic content of their speech. Expand
Testing comprehension abilities in users of British Sign Language following CVA
TLDR
People with left hemisphere damage were impaired relative to controls on all tests, and those with right hemisphere damage performed well in the first two tests, but were impaired on locative sentences and classifiers. Expand
Integrity and function of gestures in aphasia
ABSTRACT Background: Gestures can provide an excellent natural alternative to verbal communication in people with aphasia (PWA). However, despite numerous studies focusing on gesture production inExpand
Title : Integrity and function of gestures in aphasia
Background: Gestures can provide an excellent natural alternative to verbal communication in people with aphasia (PWA). However, despite numerous studies focusing on gesture production in aphasia, itExpand
Dissociating linguistic and nonlinguistic gestural communication in the brain
TLDR
Using fMRI, the neural correlates of viewing a gestural language (BSL) and a manual-brachial code (Tic Tac) relative to a low-level baseline task suggest that the planum temporale may be responsive to visual movement in both deaf and hearing people, yet when hearing is absent early in development, the visual processing role of this region is enhanced. Expand
Exploring perceptual processing of ASL and human actions: Effects of inversion and repetition priming
TLDR
The study suggests that sign expertise may lead to modifications of a general-purpose human action recognition system rather than evoking a qualitatively different mode of processing, and supports the contention that signed languages make use of perceptual systems through which humans understand or parse human actions and gestures more generally. Expand
Signs in the brain: Hearing signers’ cross-linguistic semantic integration strategies
Audio-oral speech and visuo-manual sign language as used by the Deaf community are two very different realizations of the human linguistic communication system. Sign language is not only used by theExpand
Treatment of Phonological Anomia in Aphasia: Some Suggestions for Users of Signed Language
Aphasiologists agree that with damage to the left hemisphere of the brain, both those who use vocal and those who use signed forms of communication are in jeopardy of developing aphasia, an impairedExpand
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