Anyone Can Become a Troll: Causes of Trolling Behavior in Online Discussions

@article{Cheng2017AnyoneCB,
  title={Anyone Can Become a Troll: Causes of Trolling Behavior in Online Discussions},
  author={Justin Cheng and Michael S. Bernstein and Cristian Danescu-Niculescu-Mizil and Jure Leskovec},
  journal={CSCW : proceedings of the Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work. Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work},
  year={2017},
  volume={2017},
  pages={
          1217-1230
        }
}
In online communities, antisocial behavior such as trolling disrupts constructive discussion. While prior work suggests that trolling behavior is confined to a vocal and antisocial minority, we demonstrate that ordinary people can engage in such behavior as well. We propose two primary trigger mechanisms: the individual's mood, and the surrounding context of a discussion (e.g., exposure to prior trolling behavior). Through an experiment simulating an online discussion, we find that both… CONTINUE READING
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