Ants show a leftward turning bias when exploring unknown nest sites

@inproceedings{Hunt2014AntsSA,
  title={Ants show a leftward turning bias when exploring unknown nest sites},
  author={Edmund R Hunt and Thomas A O'Shea-Wheller and Gregory F Albery and Tamsyn H. Bridger and Mike Gumn and Nigel R. Franks},
  booktitle={Biology letters},
  year={2014}
}
Behavioural lateralization in invertebrates is an important field of study because it may provide insights into the early origins of lateralization seen in a diversity of organisms. Here, we present evidence for a leftward turning bias in Temnothorax albipennis ants exploring nest cavities and in branching mazes, where the bias is initially obscured by thigmotaxis (wall-following) behaviour. Forward travel with a consistent turning bias in either direction is an effective nest exploration… CONTINUE READING
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