Ants of the genus Myrmecia Fabricius: A review of the species groups and their phylogenetic relationships (Hymenoptera: Formicidae: Myrmeciinae)

@article{Ogata1991AntsOT,
  title={Ants of the genus Myrmecia Fabricius: A review of the species groups and their phylogenetic relationships (Hymenoptera: Formicidae: Myrmeciinae)},
  author={Kazuo Ogata},
  journal={Systematic Entomology},
  year={1991},
  volume={16}
}
  • K. Ogata
  • Published 1 July 1991
  • Biology
  • Systematic Entomology
Abstract. Myrmecia Fabricius is revised at species‐group level. Nine groups are recognized: those of M.aberrans, M.cephalotes, M.gulosa, M.mandibularis, M.nigrocincta, M.picta, M.pilosula, M.tepperi and M. urens. A key to the species groups is provided, and worker diagnoses, illustrations and species lists are given for each. Eight groups are constituted much as in the previous classification of John Clark, but defined using new characters. Phylogenetic relationships are investigated, with six… 

Phylogenetic relationships among species groups of the ant genus Myrmecia.

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Phylogeny and biogeography of the ant subfamily Myrmeciinae (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

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