Ants and the fossil record.

@article{Lapolla2013AntsAT,
  title={Ants and the fossil record.},
  author={John S. Lapolla and G. M. Dlussky and Vincent Perrichot},
  journal={Annual review of entomology},
  year={2013},
  volume={58},
  pages={
          609-30
        }
}
The dominance of ants in the terrestrial biosphere has few equals among animals today, but this was not always the case. The oldest ants appear in the fossil record 100 million years ago, but given the scarcity of their fossils, it is presumed they were relatively minor components of Mesozoic insect life. The ant fossil record consists of two primary types of fossils, each with inherent biases: as imprints in rock and as inclusions in fossilized resins (amber). New imaging technology allows… CONTINUE READING

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