Antivenoms for the Treatment of Spider Envenomation

@article{Nicholson2003AntivenomsFT,
  title={Antivenoms for the Treatment of Spider Envenomation},
  author={G. Nicholson and A. Graudins},
  journal={Journal of Toxicology: Toxin Reviews},
  year={2003},
  volume={22},
  pages={35 - 59}
}
There are several groups of medically important araneomorph and mygalomorph spiders responsible for serious systemic envenomation. These include spiders from the genus Latrodectus (family Theridiidae), Phoneutria (family Ctenidae) and the subfamily Atracinae (genera Atrax and Hadronyche). The venom of these spiders contains potent neurotoxins that cause excessive neurotransmitter release via vesicle exocytosis or modulation of voltage‐gated sodium channels. In addition, spiders of the genus… Expand
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