Antipyretic treatment does not improve survival of critically ill patients with infection.

@article{Kiekkas2020AntipyreticTD,
  title={Antipyretic treatment does not improve survival of critically ill patients with infection.},
  author={Panagiotis Kiekkas and Eleni Michalopoulos and Diamanto Aretha},
  journal={Australian critical care : official journal of the Confederation of Australian Critical Care Nurses},
  year={2020}
}
1 Citations

Is hypophosphataemia an independent predictor of mortality in critically ill patients with bloodstream infection? A multicenter retrospective cohort study.

  • M. PadelliC. Aubron C. Leven
  • Medicine, Biology
    Australian critical care : official journal of the Confederation of Australian Critical Care Nurses
  • 2020

References

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Management of fever in critically ill patients with infection

It seems that antipyretic therapy should be performed according to each patient’s situation, and if the fever itself is within a normal physiological response accompanied by compensating changes in vital signs including heart rate and respiratory rate, it might be better not to treat the fever.

Fever control in critically ill adults. An individual patient data meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

The hypotheses that more active fever management would increase survival among patient subgroups with limited physiological reserves such as older patients, patients with higher illness acuity, and those requiring organ support are rejected.

Effect of active temperature management on mortality in intensive care unit patients.

When the therapeutic goal is to reduce body temperature, physical cooling approaches may be more effective than pharmacological measures in critically ill adults.

Correction: Association of body temperature and antipyretic treatments with mortality of critically ill patients with and without sepsis: multi-centered prospective observational study

Association of body temperature and antipyretic treatments with mortality of critically ill patients with and without sepsis: multi-centered prospective observational study for Fever and Antipyretics in Critically ill patients Evaluation (FACE).

A survey of fever management in febrile intensive care patients without neurological injury

  • M. SaxenaN. Hammond J. Myburgh
  • Medicine
    Critical care and resuscitation : journal of the Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine
  • 2011
There was considerable variability in attitudes to fever management with a reported tendency to act to reduce fever in febrile patients with sepsis and broad support for a clinical trial of fever management.

Nursing personnel's attitudes towards fever and antipyresis of adult patients: cross-sectional survey.

Advancing nurses' evidence-based knowledge about fever and antipyresis is expected to limit their tendency to overtreat fever and favour fever care based on the assessment of actual patient demands.

Causes and consequences of fever complicating critical surgical illness.

Postoperative fever is deleterious to critically ill patients, and the presence of SIRS, emergency status, higher APACHE III score and the peak temperature were associated with increased mortality, with peak temperature being the most powerful predictor in the model.

Fever Management Practices of Neuroscience Nurses: What Has Changed?

This study encourages the development of a stepwise approach to neuro-specific protocols for fever management in neuroscience patients and shows the continuing need to promote further education and specialty training among nurses and encourage collaboration with physicians to establish best practices.

Fever effects and treatment in critical care: literature review.