Antipyretic drugs in patients with fever and infection: literature review.

@article{Ludwig2019AntipyreticDI,
  title={Antipyretic drugs in patients with fever and infection: literature review.},
  author={Jennifer L. Ludwig and Hazel McWhinnie},
  journal={British journal of nursing},
  year={2019},
  volume={28 10},
  pages={
          610-618
        }
}
BACKGROUND antipyretic drugs are routinely administered to febrile patients with infection in secondary care. However, the use of antipyretics to suppress fever during infection remains a controversial topic within the literature. It is argued that fever suppression may interfere with the body's natural defence mechanisms, and may worsen patient outcomes. METHOD a literature review was undertaken to determine whether the administration of antipyretic drugs to adult patients with infection and… 

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The evidence on which to base recommendations for practice is weak but does not support the current practice of administering antipyretic therapies routinely to patients with fever, and physical cooling methods alone should never be used.

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The primary goal of treating the febrile child should be to improve the child's overall comfort rather than focus on the normalization of body temperature, and Pediatricians should also promote patient safety by advocating for simplified formulations, dosing instructions, and dosing devices.

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