Antioxidants add protection to a broad‐spectrum sunscreen

@article{Wu2011AntioxidantsAP,
  title={Antioxidants add protection to a broad‐spectrum sunscreen},
  author={Ya F. Wu and Mary S. Matsui and John Z. S. Chen and Xia Jin and Chi-min Shu and Gong Yong Jin and G-H Dong and Yong Wang and Xiaohu Gao and Hong-Duo Chen and Ying Li},
  journal={Clinical and Experimental Dermatology},
  year={2011},
  volume={36}
}
Background.  Exposure of human skin to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) results in erythema, pigment darkening, skin cancer and photoageing. In addition to conventional organochemical and the physical–mineral type sunscreens (SS), other non‐SS protective strategies have been investigated, including antioxidants (AOx) and topical DNA repair enzymes. 
The Role of Topical Antioxidants in Photoprotection
There many reasons for interest in the photoprotective potential of topical antioxidant botanical extracts. These include consumer demand for non-sunscreen photoprotective ingredients, the
Development and photoprotective effect of a sunscreen containing the antioxidants Spirulina and dimethylmethoxy chromanol on sun‐induced skin damage
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    European journal of pharmaceutical sciences : official journal of the European Federation for Pharmaceutical Sciences
  • 2017
Photoprotection: part II. Sunscreen: development, efficacy, and controversies.
Radical-Scavenging Activity of a Sunscreen Enriched by Antioxidants Providing Protection in the Whole Solar Spectral Range
TLDR
Compared to the untreated skin, the sunscreen decreased the skin radical formation in the UV and VIS regions, and the possibility of the development of effective and safer sunscreen products is shown.
A comprehensive topical antioxidant inhibits oxidative stress induced by blue light exposure and cigarette smoke in human skin tissue
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This study evaluated a comprehensive topical antioxidant's ability to inhibit ROS production induced by blue light and cigarette smoke in human skin.
Current challenges in photoprotection.
Plant Secondary Metabolites against Skin Photodamage: Mexican Plants, a Potential Source of UV-Radiation Protectant Molecules
Human skin works as a barrier against the adverse effects of environmental agents, including ultraviolet radiation (UVR). Exposure to UVR is associated with a variety of harmful effects on the skin,
Modern sun protection.
Sustained effect of two antioxidants (oxothiazolidine and δ‐tocopheryl glucoside) for immediate and long‐term sun protection in a sunscreen emulsion based on their different penetrating properties
TLDR
This work investigates the dermal bioavailability and antioxidative properties of a sunscreen formulation containing two antioxidants, oxothiazolidine and DTG, which reacts directly with reactive oxygen species to form taurine and is metabolized in δ‐tocopherol to achieve antioxidative activities.
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