Antioxidant therapy in intensive care

@article{Lovat2003AntioxidantTI,
  title={Antioxidant therapy in intensive care},
  author={Robin Lovat and Jean-Charles Preiser},
  journal={Current Opinion in Critical Care},
  year={2003},
  volume={9},
  pages={266-270}
}
Purpose of reviewThis review intends to summarize the recent findings regarding the presence of increased oxidative stress in critically ill patients and its potential pathophysiologic role, as well as the results of recent clinical trials of antioxidant therapies. Recent findingsSeveral lines of evidence confirm the increase in oxidative stress during critical illness. The oxidative damage to cells and tissues eventually contributes to organ failure. Prophylactic administration of antioxidant… 
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