Antimicrobial Effect of Visible Light—Photoinactivation of Legionella rubrilucens by Irradiation at 450, 470, and 620 nm

@article{Schmid2019AntimicrobialEO,
  title={Antimicrobial Effect of Visible Light—Photoinactivation of Legionella rubrilucens by Irradiation at 450, 470, and 620 nm},
  author={Julian Schmid and Katharina Hoenes and Petra Vatter and Martin Hessling},
  journal={Antibiotics},
  year={2019},
  volume={8}
}
Despite the high number of legionella infections, there are currently no convincing preventive measures. Photoinactivation with visible light is a promising new approach and the photoinactivation sensitivity properties of planktonic Legionella rubrilucens to 450, 470, and 620 nm irradiation were thus investigated and compared to existing 405 nm inactivation data for obtaining information on responsible endogenous photosensitizers. Legionella were streaked on agar plates and irradiated with… 

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