Antiemetic prophylaxis does not improve outcomes after outpatient surgery when compared to symptomatic treatment.

@article{Scuderi1999AntiemeticPD,
  title={Antiemetic prophylaxis does not improve outcomes after outpatient surgery when compared to symptomatic treatment.},
  author={P. Scuderi and R. James and L. Harris and G. Mims},
  journal={Anesthesiology},
  year={1999},
  volume={90 2},
  pages={
          360-71
        }
}
BACKGROUND Although prophylactic administration of antiemetics reduces the incidence of postoperative nausea, vomiting, or both (PONV), there is little evidence to suggest this improves patient outcomes. The authors hypothesized that early symptomatic treatment of PONV will result in outcomes, including time to discharge, unanticipated admission, patient satisfaction, and time to return to normal daily activities, that are similar to those achieved with routine prophylaxis. METHODS Men and… Expand
Role of Complementary and Novel Antiemetic Therapies
  • P. White
  • Medicine
  • International anesthesiology clinics
  • 2003
TLDR
When patients develop nausea and vomiting despite traditional pharmacologic prophylaxis, consideration should be given to the use of complimentary nonpharmacologic and other novel therapies. Expand
Multimodal Antiemetic Management Prevents Early Postoperative Vomiting After Outpatient Laparoscopy
TLDR
It is concluded that both multimodal management and routine monotherapy antiemetic prophylaxis resulted in an increased level of patient satisfaction than symptomatic treatment in this high-risk population of women undergoing outpatient laparoscopy. Expand
Antiemetic Prophylaxis for Office-based Surgery: Are the 5-HT3 Receptor Antagonists Beneficial?
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The addition of dolasetron or ondansetron failed to improve the antiemetic efficacy of droperidol and dexamethasone when they were used for routine prophylaxis in the office-based surgery setting. Expand
Cost-effectiveness of Prophylactic Antiemetic Therapy with Ondansetron, Droperidol, or Placebo
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The use of prophylactic antiemetic therapy in high-risk ambulatory surgical patients was more effective in preventing PONV and achieved greater patient satisfaction at a lower cost compared with placebo. Expand
The Safety and Efficacy of Prophylactic Ondansetron in Patients Undergoing Modified Radical Mastectomy
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It is concluded that prophylactic ondansetron is safe and effective and that its routine use is justified and recommended to prevent PONV after MRM, as it significantly improves perioperative patient satisfaction and outcome. Expand
Does the Routine Prophylactic Use of Antiemetics Affect the Incidence of Postdischarge Nausea and Vomiting following Ambulatory Surgery?: A Systematic Review of Randomized Controlled Trials
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This systematic review was completed to address the question of whether the routine prophylactic use of antiemetics affects the incidence of PDNV following ambulatory surgery. Expand
Cost-effective Antiemesis
TLDR
Postoperative nausea and vomiting is one of the most commonly encountered adverse consequences of anesthesia and surgery and may lead to dehydration and electrolyte imbalance and prolonged stay in the postanesthesia recovery unit (PACU) or result in unanticipated admission to an inpatient facility after ambulatory surgery. Expand
A Comparison of the Costs and Efficacy of Ondansetron Versus Dolasetron for Antiemetic Prophylaxis
TLDR
It is concluded that 12.5 mg of dolasetron IV is more cost effective than 4 mg of ondansetronIV for preventing PONV after otolaryngologic surgery and is associated with similar patient satisfaction at a reduced cost. Expand
A risk score-dependent antiemetic approach effectively reduces postoperative nausea and vomiting — a continuous quality improvement initiative
TLDR
This is the first survey which suggests that the departmental incidence of PONV can be significantly lowered by a risk score-dependent antiemetic strategy through a quality improvement initiative. Expand
Evidence-based management of postoperative nausea and vomiting: a review
  • A. Habib, T. Gan
  • Medicine
  • Canadian journal of anaesthesia = Journal canadien d'anesthesie
  • 2004
TLDR
These guidelines provided evidence-based guidelines for the management of postoperative nausea and vomiting based on the available literature on the basis of randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, logistic regression analyses and expert opinion. Expand
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References

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The Effect of Timing of Ondansetron Administration in Outpatients Undergoing Otolaryngologic Surgery
TLDR
Ondansetron (4 mg IV) was more effective in reducing the need for rescue antiemetics in the recovery room when administered at the end versus prior to the start of otolaryngologic surgery. Expand
Comparison of Ondansetron Versus Placebo to Prevent Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting in Women Undergoing Ambulatory Gynecologic Surgery
TLDR
Ondansetron given intravenously to prevent postoperative nausea and emesis was highly effective in the 4− and 8-mg doses in women having ambulatory gynecologic surgery. Expand
Ondansetron prevents postoperative emesis in male outpatients
TLDR
Ondansetron 4 mg was more effective than placebo in preventing postoperative nausea and vomiting in male outpatients and patients' perceptions of the debilitating effects of PONV in the ambulatory surgery setting are studied. Expand
Treatment of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting after Outpatient Surgery with the 5‐HT3 Antagonist Ondansetron
TLDR
Ondansetron, in doses less than 8 mg, is a safe, effective antiemetic for treating postoperative nausea and vomiting in patients following outpatient surgery. Expand
A Comparison of Costs and Efficacy of Ondansetron and Droperidol as Prophylactic Antiemetic Therapy for Elective Outpatient Gynecologic Procedures
TLDR
It is concluded that droperidol 0.625 mg IV provides antiemetic prophylaxis comparable to that of ondansetron 4 mg IV without increasing side effects or delaying discharge and is more cost-effective. Expand
Intravenous Dolasetron for the Prevention of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting After Outpatient Laparoscopic Gynecologic Surgery
TLDR
Dolasetron was an effective and well tolerated preventive treatment for PONV resulting from laparoscopic gynecologic surgery and was significantly (P = 0.0131) greater than that with placebo. Expand
Treatment of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting with Single Intravenous Doses of Dolasetron Mesylate: A Multicenter Trial
TLDR
In this study of 620 patients undergoing surgery, a 12.5-mg dose of intravenous dolasetron, a new serotonin-receptor blocker, was significantly more effective than placebo in treating established postoperative nausea and vomiting. Expand
Tropisetron for the Prevention of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting in Women Undergoing Gynecologic Surgery
TLDR
It is concluded that tropisetron given IV prior to gynecologic procedures in general anesthesia significantly reduces postoperative nausea and vomiting when compared to placebo without causing any adverse effect. Expand
Efficacy, Dose‐Response, and Safety of Ondansetron in Prevention of Postoperative Nausea and Vomiting: A Quantitative Systematic Review of Randomized Placebo‐controlled Trials
TLDR
If the risk of PONV is very high, for every 100 patients receiving an adequate dose of ondansetron 20 patients will not vomit and three will have a headache who would not have had these adverse effects without the drug. Expand
RETRACTED ARTICLE: Granisetron reduces postoperative nausea and vomiting throughout menstrual cycle
TLDR
Granisetron was effective in reducing the incidence of PONV in both phases of the menstrual cycle studied, and was comparable with respect to patient demographics, types of surgery, anaesthetics administered and analgesics used postoperatively. Expand
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